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History of Medicine

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William Gosset: A True Student

Today I attended a Basic Epidemiology class meant for the undergraduate students as I thought it would be good to brush up on my basic knowledge. The topics for the day were Hypothesis Testing and An Introduction to Randomized Controlled Trials, both pretty important ones, no matter which level you are studying at. What struck… Keep Reading

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Comic Book Meets Medicine: Little Orphan Annie

One of the classic histopathological signs that we read of in Pathology quite often is the Orphan Annie Eye nucleus seen in Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. This odd name has an interesting history behind it. One that dates back to two popcult references – one at the fag end of the 1800s and one… Keep Reading

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Charles Beevor: The Sign of a “Bloody” Jerk

Forgive the hyperbolic title. Do not take offense and read on before hating on me. Please note the post script for added justification for this inflammatory title, if you so feel. Thanks. Now on with the main show! Not the best known of neurologists, history has not been very kind to this amicable gentleman, who… Keep Reading

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Santiago Ramon y Cajal: The Craftsman of Science

Scientists often are classed to be a group who are so lost within the intricacies of their vast subjects that they forget to look out into the world or explore the horizons of other specialties. We often tend to stereotype scientists into certain classes and blocks based on the achievements they garnered in their respective… Keep Reading

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Argyll Robertson: Better Be His Pupil, Than Have It!

Argyll Robertson pupils (“AR pupils”) are bilateral small pupils that constrict when the patient focuses on a near object (they “accommodate”), but do not constrict when exposed to bright light (they do not “react” to light). This condition is colloquially referred to as the “Whore’s Eye” because of the association with tertiary syphilis and because… Keep Reading

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Harry Potter and Corynebacterium

One of the earliest posts on this blog was a Harry Potter movie review. So it is only fitting that with the final installment of the Harry Potter octology set to release in a few days, the Pottermaniacs like me are getting worked up and to celebrate that spirit, I decided to log in this… Keep Reading

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Valentine’s Day Special: John Hunter

In this special series, I will try to head up to Valentine’s Day with a series of posts to celebrate the day of love with posts not quite so pink and rosey. And I will start with the volatile Scottish surgeon: John Hunter! Yeah. You read that right! Read on, to understand why I chose… Keep Reading

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Life Beyond Medicine

Tuskegee in Guatemala: Reblog from H&H

I stumbled across this blog from The Centre for the Humanities and Health at King’s College London, a Wellcome Trust-funded research centre in the Medical Humanities, which really caught my fancy. I liked several posts, and especially loved this one. habving read Susan Reverby’s draft paper, I must say I was a little shocked with… Keep Reading

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