Tag archive

BMJ

Life Beyond Medicine

Valentine’s Day Kills!

I wish all my readers a very Happy Valentine’s Day and though I am spending it in a rather sad and loser-like fashion, I hope y’all make a day out of it! I know this is the day when pink sappiness overrules our lives and the loveless ones like myself feel rather left out of… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Research Blogging

Why the BMJ Should Not Follow NEJM Author Ban Policy

Fiona Godlee has written a very interesting Editorial in the BMJ and this tweet of hers made me think on this issue: For a while in the 90s NEJM banned editorials and reviews from authors linked to industry. Should the BMJ try this? http://bit.ly/rczXJt — fiona godlee (@fgodlee) August 11, 2011 I oppose the blanket… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Research Blogging

Harry Potter and the Missing Trauma Cases

With the last Harry Potter movie in the piping (due for a global release this weekend), it is understandable if the Potter craze gets a little irked this time around. And in true keeping with my Pottermania, in this post, I am going to examine the effect the release of Potter books/movies has on us.… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Research Blogging

The Open Reviews Debate

The point-counter-point articles by Karim Khan and Trish Groves published on November 2010 caught my attention when the latter tweeted a link to her side of the story a couple of days ago: http://twitter.com/#!/trished/status/53044806108188672 At the outset of this post, let me make one thing clear: I know that open peer review is a good… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Research Blogging

BMJ Open: New Open Access Journal

This journal has been in the piping for quite some time as it had already been declared in the BMJ Blogs. It went live quite some time ago (February 24th) but I just managed to procrastinate posting this till now! http://twitter.com/#!/BMJ_Open/status/40541838293078016 The new journal works on the principle of the author paying system, much like… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Research Blogging

Death Drug on the Death Row

In the lethal injections used to execute prisoners on the death row, one of the major components is an important anesthetic drug called sodium thiopental. Under a three drug protocol, sodium thiopental is used to anaesthetise the prisoner, then pancuronium bromide paralyses him, before potassium chloride is administered to cause a fatal heart attack. (1)… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Research Blogging

The Student BMJ Cartoons Wakefield

The Student BMJ is by far the most popular medical student publication in the world. It has just run a cartoon on the issue of the Wakefieldian MMR-Autism mishap. Take a look. To see the high res version of the cartoon, and find more reading links and stuff, click on the image to go to… Keep Reading

Placeholder
#HCSM/Research Blogging

Did the HIFA2015 Save HINARI?

Alongwith a multitude of other health bloggers, I blogged about publishers pulling out nearly 2500 titles from the HINARI. You can read more about that here. Now, it was followed by an article in the BMJ which raised a storm in the email discussion forum called HIFA 2015 (Health Information for All by 2015). Now… Keep Reading

Placeholder
Research Blogging

Who Will Guard the Guardians?

In a grove of trees in the grounds of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, is a statue in memory of Albert Einstein. On it are engraved three of his sayings. One reads: “The right to search for truth implies also a duty; one must not conceal any part of what one has… Keep Reading

Go to Top