Longitudinal Data Analysis: A Brief Introduction

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I presented this brief introduction to longitudinal data analysis in the Department of Community Medicine at the University College of Medical Sciences and Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, New Delhi as a part of the Residency (PG) Academic Program. Meant as a primer for the MD-students of all the three years, this contains basic principles on the methods applied for analysis of longitudinal studies. I must admit that my understanding of modeling of longitudinal data is wobbly at best and there is a great likelihood I made mistakes, but for disclosure of the presented material and keeping a record of my academic activities, I decided to put it up.

The background score is Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos in D, K. 448 (the entire piece is a little longer and is a joy to hear: this one lasts for as long as the video runs). It is possible that I may have been off target on many issues here; please be kind in criticism. Please drop me a line at my email address “mail [at] pranab [dot] in” if you have any suggestions or hints that could help me better understand this topic. I realize that several of the slides are completely incomprehensible in the current format, because they were made to be narrated alongwith. Hopefully that will not be a major impediment in understanding the whole concept. I hope you enjoy the presentation (well, more like just the slides) as much as I did making them!

I initially used to upload the powerpoint slides onto Google Docs or other slide sharing websites and then embedded them here. In this new experiment, I am trying to make short videos out of the presented matter and put up the videos instead. It makes this visually easier (there are loads of issues with the embedding and they do not seem to work on all browsers with equal efficacy). While it is an unfortunate consequence that the slides cannot be repurposed (which is not a bad thing if one has understood the issue, in my opinion) with ease, I am always ready to share the presentation (or parts thereof); if you need any bits of this, or all of it, please drop me an email.

Skeptic Oslerphile, Scientist at the Indian Council of Medical Research, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases. Interests include: Emerging Infections, Public Health, Antimicrobial Resistance, One Health and Zoonoses, Diarrheal Diseases, Medical Education, Medical History, Open Access, Healthcare Social Media and Health2.0. Opinions are my own!

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